Wednesday, 31 July 2013

I spy with my little eye ...

Espionage and film noir. What a combination. And who better to create the duplicitous agent than Conrad Veidt? He fled Nazi Germany with his Jewish wife - and gave most of his salary to good causes during the war.

Tragically, he died before seeing Hitler vanquished. Nonetheless, he did his bit to show up the evils of the Third Reich. The Spy in Black is a lesser known late 1930s thriller with a dark edge - and check out Valerie Hobson. Is she what she seems? Of course not.

Spies and more spies. Perfect.


Thursday, 25 July 2013

Cool and noir

Looking for ways to survive the heat. Brooding 'film noir' is the answer. Suddenly, I had an urge to revisit Enigma. What a cast.


As soon as I saw the cover, I was reminded of Half Life! Looming faces, sepia background, whiff of danger. Not interested in Dougray Scott at all. No, no, no.

If anyone's interested, Shadow of a Doubt is on Film 4 on Friday morning. Set those Skyboxes now.


Nordic inspiration

We're back from a holiday in Finland. Just avoiding the heat! A mere 25 degrees F in Helsinki, as opposed to 34 C in the UK.

You won't believe the pictures. Today, Rob visited a Finnish submarine from the 1930s. Photos galore. Just a sneak peek into some research. Expect submarines in the sequel. Check this out.


Friday, 19 July 2013

Snapshot of Half Life

I've just rustled up a new pinboard . It's an insight into Norway in the 1930s, the setting for our summer blockbuster, Half Life.

http://pinterest.com/pamkelt/half-life/

A touch of Nordic 'film noir' to keep you cool.


By Pamela Kelt

Tuesday, 16 July 2013

Half Life - the video trailer

To celebrate the confirmed date, I've just completed the video book trailer for Half Life, a 'film noir' romantic thriller set in 1930s Norway.

Find it on Youtube here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLzJkqB_swg), or find it on the Half Life blog (http://halflife-pkrjd.blogspot.co.uk/) along with some historical background about this fascinating period.

Here are a few stills from the video to give a taste ...









Monday, 8 July 2013

Half Life release date 16 August

Picture The headline says it all. Check out the Half Life blog along with some background to this fascinating period.

Autumn 1936. 

Clouds of war are gathering in Europe and the Fascists are eyeing up possible nuclear resources in Scandinavia.

High-flying Cambridge nuclear scientist Dr Dulcie Bennett travels to northern Norway to join an elite group of researchers bent on unlocking the secrets of the atom. She makes a startling breakthrough on a radioactive experiment, but a suspicious lab explosion derails her plans.

John Kirkwall is a troubled Canadian journalist in Sohlberg on a personal quest to uncover the real story behind a doomed polar expedition. Despite initial misunderstandings, they are drawn to one another. Soon, they become embroiled in a shady world of spies, saboteurs, secret police, neurotic academics, anti-semitism, murky political and sexual intrigue.

As winter grips, they enlist the help of the local Sami community, persecuted by the increasingly powerful right-wing nationalist party, and together they expose a dark and shameful secret of Norway’s past, bringing to light a treacherous plot that could tilt the balance of power in Hitler’s favour.

By Pamela Kelt and Robert J Deeth

Thursday, 4 July 2013

Short and sweet

Big week for short stories.

I put up my first piece on Smashwords this week. The Deed Box is a dark little number with a macabre twist. It's actually based on a family crisis from some years back - but it's fiction. Honest!

I got 30 downloads in the first few years. Which is nice, but then. It's FREE! I had so much, I made a video.
See it here.

Meanwhile, out of the blue, I got message from a children's literary magazine, the Caterpillar, accepting a short story called Alakazzam. Quite a contrast from The Deed Box, it's about Aladdin's lesser-known sister, who has a few tricks up her sleeve.


I'm rediscovering the art of the short story. Can't be bad.

Time to celebrate.

By Pamela Kelt